The Bannock Factory Hopes to Take to the Streets

 
 

Food trailer among business’ plans for future

By: Cindy Chan

Canstar Community News – ONLINE EDITION

The Bannock Factory hopes to take to the streets

Food trailer among business’ plans for future

By: Cindy Chan

Ted Bozyk (left), Phil Faraci, and Anthony Faraci have been selling Bannock-in-a-Box out of their pop-up shop as part of the Downtown Winnipeg BIZ’s campaign,  the Launch It! Youth Entrepreneurship Incubator and Pop Up Shop project.

CINDY CHAN Enlarge Image

Ted Bozyk (left), Phil Faraci, and Anthony Faraci have been selling Bannock-in-a-Box out of their pop-up shop as part of the Downtown Winnipeg BIZ’s campaign, the Launch It! Youth Entrepreneurship Incubator and Pop Up Shop project. Photo Store

The Bannock Factory has a lot of irons in the fire — or rather, loaves in the oven.

The business, which usually prepares its bannock at a bakery in Charleswood which they rent space from after-hours, is expanding its scope of late. From March 25 to April 15, its Bannock-in-a-Box product, consisting of six individual pieces of bannock, is being sold for $5 at Portage Place Mall as part of a new campaign.

The Bannock Factory is one of seven businesses participating in the Downtown Winnipeg BIZ’s latest campaign, the Launch It! Youth Entrepreneurship Incubator and Pop Up Shop project.

“It’s the product of two years of discussion with young entrepreneurs, the entrepreneur resource community, as well as the general public,” Downtown Winnipeg BIZ managing director Jason Syvixay said. “We met with members of the public to ask them, ‘How can we support entrepreneurs in our downtown? How do we see small local businesses develop?’”

The Launch It! project provides a space on the second floor of Portage Place to allow several businesses to test out their product with the downtown market, since “Portage Place has significant foot traffic,” according to Syvixay.

“They are using the storefront as a place for them to see if their ideas will take off, without losing their life savings,” Syvixay said.

Phil Faraci and Ted Bozyk introduced Bannock-in-a-Box at Festival du Voyageur in 2013, and it was the first product Farboz Foods — Faraci’s company — introduced under the Bannock Factory name. They had also been selling it  at Local Meats & Frozen Treats (1604 St. Mary’s Rd.). They sold the product to the Sugar Shack tent to use for sandwiches, and they were also sold as is.

Since then, 16 stores in Winnipeg and 13 in rural areas have added the product to their shelves, according to Faraci.

Since then, The Bannock Factory has been providing bannock at many events — and at one event, they learned a lot of people liked taking the corner pieces.

“That’s why we went with the smaller individual pieces. We sell them as six pieces in a box. People like the individuality of it and the individual portions. The fact that it’s fully baked and ready to go makes it really convenient,” Bozyk said.

Faraci said the business is trying to make bannock more well-known and widespread.

“It’s not just the Metis and aboriginal people that are supporting it. We’re trying to make bannock mainstream for those people who don’t know where to get it and if they don’t have friends that make it,” Faraci explained.

So far, business has been good for The Bannock Factory at Portage Place.

“People are coming here (and) buying two, three, four boxes at a time,” Bozyk said.

But their work at Portage Place isn’t the only new idea they’ve cooked up. Faraci’s son, Anthony, is currently working on getting a food trailer for the business. Some of the menu items expected to be served from the trailer include bannock dogs, pizza, sandwiches, and burgers.

“Seeing other people use our product for sandwiches kind of gave me the idea,” Anthony said.

“We’re excited there’s going to be a trailer,” Faraci said.

Anthony said the trailer will likely be up and running by this summer.

“It’s in the process. We’re almost there,” Anthony said.

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